Thursday, September 8, 2011

Google Tells You How To Go About Getting A Job, Write The Best Resume!.

It is hard to bring bread to the table for many people these days and writing proper resume's are the last things in people's mind even though it should reside in frontal lobes some where.
One Google's recruiting expert, Jeff Moore tells us how to go about it. Even though the post mentioned below targets college graduates (The post is on Google Students Blog!) aspiring to become Googlers, we all can take some advise to take away from these Recruiter Tips and Tricks;

Show off your strengths – Makes sense, right? You want your resume to show off what makes you special and give recruiters a reason to interview you. The big things on your resume should make employers say, “wow!” It doesn’t really matter if it’s your education, internships or special awards, just make sure to show off your skills/experience and try to impress because (cliché alert!) you never get a second chance to make a first impression.

The devil is in the details – A detailed resume is a good resume. The more info you share, the more a recruiter or hiring manager can look at your accomplishments and determine if you are a good fit for their team. For example, which one of these candidates would you want to talk to?

Candidate A – Wrote several applications to improve efficiency within the finance group.

Candidate B – Used Java and PHP to write financial accounting application that saved the company over 25 hours a week of productivity resulting in over $100K in savings.

Remember, your resume is your message to the hiring team—tell them as much as you can so they can make the most informed decision.

Keep it short – Huh? Didn’t he just say, “tell them as much as you can”? I did, but that doesn’t mean you should write a 15 page resume. What you want is a clear, concise resume that accurately describes your accomplishments. Assuming you are a new college grad, you probably want to stick to one page. However, if you have significant accomplishments (publications, open source contributions, startups, awards, etc.) it is acceptable to go on to a second page. Lots of career services folks will tell you “one page only.” I don’t subscribe to that, as long as the content of your resume is relevant.

Spelling and grammar – I don’t even need to mention this...you get it right? We have spell check for a reason. You'd be shocked at how many resumes I see with spelling errors. Grammar and spelling mistake look sloppy. Don't be careless, and don't depend on spell check. Proof read your resume and have others proof it as well.

Know your target – Make sure your resume is targeted to the right audience. I’d recommend you add an “Objective” at the top of your resume (below your name!) that clearly states what your want to accomplish. Think of the objective as your “elevator pitch”, a concise statement to convince the hiring manager or recruiter that you are worth an initial conversation. Your objective and the meat of your resume should portray someone who is a fit for the job and company. For example, if you want a job at a specific company write an objective like this:

Objective – To obtain a fast-paced and exciting role within the Google Staffing team.

As opposed to this….

Objective – To get a job at Google.



Recruiter Tips & Tricks: preparing your resume Sphere: Related Content

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